Filologia angielska - słownictwo

rok studiow 1 | 2 | 3 | 4
topic Communication | Crime and Punishment | Education | Environment | Ethical Issues | Health | Mass Media | Politically Correct Language | Politics | Relationships | Science and Technology | Communication
1201-1250 z 2565
Słówko Definicja Tłumaczenie Przykład

to point the finger at sb

to indicate that sb is to blame for sth. Well, that was quite a surprise - when Jones pointed the finger at Hopkins!

to carry the can

to take the whole blame for sth.

to carry the can

I don't know, I suppose it was not such a surprise that Jones decided not to carry the can!

to leave no stone unturned

to investigate thoroughly. The police have declared that they will leave no stone unturned in their attempt to catch the crooks who robbed the bank.

to tip sb the wink

to give sb/let sb know usually secret/confidential information. The police knew that sb was going to rob the bank as sb had tipped them the wink.

to case the joint

to observe a property/place before robbing it. Apparently the thieves had been casing the joint for ages before finally burgling it.

to be in cahoots with sb

to be in (secret) collusion with sb. Criminals, like spies, are quite often in cahoots with one another.

an open and shut case

a straightforward case, one easily proved in court.

a last ditch attempt

a final attempt. The criminals made a last ditch attempt to open the safe by blowing it up, but unfortunately they blew up its contents as well!

manslaughter

killing sb but not necessarily deliberately, nieumyślne zabójstwo The charge has been reduced to manslaughter.

backlash

A strong reaction against events, normally political or social The government is facing a backlash over its policy on Europe.

nefarious

Evil or criminal. The nefarious nature of pedophilia is yet to be fully understood.

aftermath

The period of time after something such as a war, accident, storm, etc when people are still dealing with the results. It's difficult be objective in the aftermath of such terrible crimes.

copycat

a copycat crime is one that is believed to have been influenced by another, often famous, crime because it is so similar, powielony It looks like a copycat murder, although we have to investigate if it was not the same murderer as the last time, Many people commit copycat crimes because they are fascinated by other criminals.

perjury

telling lies in a law court, krzywoprzysiestwo Mark lied to the judge to protect his wife and was convicted of perjury. The judge warned the witness not to perjure herself.

accomplice

a person who helps another person to do wrong, usually a criminal, wspolsprawca The kidnaper would not be able to do it on his own, he must have had an accomplice. During the investigation the criminal admitted he had an accomplice.

iniquity

absence of moral or spiritual values, niegodziwość Terrorism is an act of iniquity.

felony

a serious crime, ciężkie przestępstwo Murder is a felony.

lese majesty

undermining one's government, przestępstwo przeciwko władzom kraju He was imprisoned for lese majesty. Guy Fawlkes' attempt to blow up parliament was lese majesty.

parole

letting a prisoner go free before the end of his/her term as reward for good behavior, etc., zwolnienie warunkowe He's going to be released on parole soon.

ransom

money paid to kidnappers for the release of a victim, okup The kidnappers demanded a ransom of $5,000,000 for the boy's release.

to acquit

formally declare in court that a person is not guilty of a crime, uniewinnić The jury acquitted her of murder, and she went home.

pyromaniac

one who gets pleasure in starting fires, one sick with pyromania, Piroman The pyromaniac almost burnt the house down.

genocide

deliberate murder of a whole community or race of people, ludobójstwo Hitler and Stalin are recent history's most terrible perpetrators of genocide.

perjury

lying in court, krzywoprzysięstwo He committed perjury so that his cousin wouldn't have to go to jail.

extort

get money or promises through threats, wymusić He extorted $2,000 from local shopkeepers, telling them they'd "pay" if they didn't pay.

impunity

To do something without fear of being punished. During the 1980s Polish UB officers could behave with impunity.

imputation

an accusation of somebody being guilty of a crime, zarzut Being confronted with an imputation embezzlement he decided to resign from the bank.

recant

to negate a statement one has made, wyprzeć się, wycofać Some witnesses recanted their statements after being threatened.

reprive

postponement or delay of punishment, odroczyć He got a temporary reprieve so the courts could go over his case again.

clemency

mercy, łaska Guy Fawlkes was too proud to plead for clemency, so they tore him to pieces.

castigate

to punish or speak to someone severly; surowo karać Criminals need to be castigated in order to learn a lesson.

incarcerate

to imprison, uwięzić The thief was incarcerated in the county jail

exonerate

to free someone of blame, oczyscić z oskarżen His testimony exonerated the company of wrongdoing.

search warrant

official document giving the police the right to search someone's home, nakaz rewizji When the police got the search warrant they found the evidence they needed.

complicity

being involved in a crime, współudzial He was charged with complicity in the murder.

incriminating

said of evidence illustrating one is guilty of a crime, obciążający The bloody glove was solid incriminating evidence that he'd killed her.

capitulate

to surrender, give in. kapitulacja The Taleban leader said his forces would never capitulate and would keep fighting to the very last man!

vengeance

punishment one gives sb in return for harm they caused, zemsta Vengeance is mine sayeth the Lord.

to edify

To improve someone's mind or character by teaching them something. Surely one of the benefits of a university education is the edifying effects it has on young people.

gravitas

Seriousness which is respected Everyone fell silent during Professor BingleySmith's speech which lent a certain gravitas to the event.

modicum

A small amount of something, especially of good quality. Academically she is not very bright, but at least she has a modicum of common sense.

kerfuffle

Unnecessary noise and activity. I'm having difficulty concentrating on what the teacher says as there is always a lot of kerfuffle during class.

hotch potch

A number of things mixed up without a sensible order or arrangement. The most frustrating things for teachers of writing is making sense of the students' hotch potch ideas

gormless

A stupid appearance He looks so gormless, you'd never guess he was a Professor of mathematics.

vocational training

preparation for a specific job rather than for life in general or simply enjoyment. szkoła zawodowa Opting out of a liberal arts college, Joe went instead for vocational training to become a welder.

an applepolisher

toady one who curries favor by being overly helpful and full of praise for sb, esp. a superior, usu. in an insincere way: BACK-SCRATCHER, BROWN-NOSER, BOOT-LICKER, ASS-KISSER, etc. lizus The only reason he gets good grades is because he's such a shameless apple polisher. What a bunch of brownnosers! They won't even tell the boss when he's making a big mistake.

cheat sheets

small scraps of paper (loaded with microscopic scribblings of information) which ill-prepared students resort to pass an examination dishonestly, as by having improper access to answers. ściągawki Bolek was caught red-handed with a whole sleeve full of crib notes.

apprentice

indentured servant learning a trade in a guild of merchants, craftsmen or artisans one who works in return for being taught and is paid very little if at all. praktykant My grandfather learned shoemaking as an apprentice to a master cobbler.

ditto

Used to say that you think the same as someone else 'I really am quite worried about my exams.'
1201-1250 z 2565
Komentarze (13)

Dużo "literówek" i kilka poważniejszych błędów.

nursery school - oznacza również ŻŁOBEK (tak podaje słownik Cambridge), kindergarten - tłumaczy się jako PRZEDSZKOLE.

Jeśli dla niektórych z Państwa brak polskiego tłumaczenia, to co robicie na tym dziale, skoro jest to dla studentów filologii? Skoro student filologii jest poziomu B2/C1 powinien, jak nie musi, być w stanie zrozumieć znaczenie
z kontekstu. Jeśli znów rozchodzi się o wymowę, to jakim problemem jest wejść na stronę słownika takiego jak, longman, czy oxford, wpisać słowo i przeczytać transkrypcję/odsłuchać wymowę? Wystarczy odrobinę pomyśleć i odpowiedź się sama nasunie. ;) Pozdrawiam serdecznie.

Na jaki poziomie są te słówka ? Czy ich znajomość jest potrzebna do zdawania CAE ?

Wielka szkoda że, nie ma możliwości wydruku w pdf...

No właśnie w pdf by się przydało ;)

ma ktoś te wszystkie słówka w PDF ??

Zdania w przykładach są proste, co tu tłumaczyć? Zwłaszcza na tym poziomie. Ja bym raczej poprosiła o wymowę słówek. Czasem akcent albo głoska wymówiona nie tak -i klapa. Ale to drobiazg. Strona świetna, dziękuję i pozdrawiam.

Jest napisane, że to dla osób, które myślą o języku poważnie. Ucząc się zaawansowanego słownictwa, przeważnie już na poziomie B2/C1 rozumie się podaną po ang. definicję. Nie ma zatem co marudzić. :)

Moim zdaniem jeżeli ktoś już jest na filologii to powinien znać podstawowe zdania, sformułowania czy słowa jakie zostały zastosowane w tych przykładach słów ciut bardziej unikalnych, jak dla mnie bajka. Świetna strona, pozdrawiam.

Brak. Mnie np brakuje tłumaczenia zdania. I to jest też głównie największy problem w książkach. Tłumaczy się słówko a nie całe zdanie. I przez to niby zastosowanie jest - no jest... ale niepełne.

Genialny pomysł, ale nieprecyzyjne wykonanie...brak polskich tłumaczeń utrudnia pracę.

Brak?

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